An update on Bob

I’ve had Bob on part-loan for a couple of months now, so I thought I’d write a post to explain what we’ve been getting up to.

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Initially I was just riding him in the school while I got to know him – we just focused on flatwork and I worked on being able to encourage him into an outline. He did used to really over-bend when I rode him and I noticed that his head carriage was very inconsistent, varying from being right up in the air to being tucked down towards his chest.

Trot poles

As I don’t often take lessons, this was the point where I had to evaluate my riding to try to find where I was going wrong. I do have a habit of shortening my reins up too much during the ride, and following a suggestion from Bob’s owner I began to lengthen and shorten my reins throughout the schooling session until I found a length that he was comfortable with and would work properly over his back with.

Bob vlog

After this I started to see a much more consistent outline from Bob, and I decided to incorporate more canter work into our schooling. From here his fitness began to increase and we also began hacking out more with a friend from the yard.

Canter

Our first long hack together had got us off to a bit of a hairy start – the two horses we were out with took off at a gallop in front of us, but when I started to let Bob go with them he threw his head down. I thought he was going to buck so started to pull him up: he didn’t like this as he wanted to keep up with the others, so then he really did start bucking! I didn’t fall but it wasn’t exactly the most reassuring beginning for us. 

Shortly after that I came off Dusty on the road while I was out on my own, so my confidence took a bit of a knock. I became quite tense when riding Bob outside of the school and continually shortened my reins up, which didn’t help at all! Once I realised what I was doing, I made a huge effort to keep my reins a little longer and to keep my hands soft – this was the turning point for us and we began to actually have fun on our hacks.

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Our past couple of hacks in particular have been fantastic: we’re usually out for a couple of hours and with the recent harvest there are lots of stubble fields to canter on. 

The increase in Bob’s fitness resulted in him losing some weight, so I could finally use his proper saddle (instead of the treeless one we’d had before). This made me feel much more secure, and I began to set out canter poles in the school. 

Before I knew it, canter poles became cross poles, and cross poles became straights! After a six month break from jumping I have decided to take it up again, and Bob is the most fantastic confidence giver. I pop him over a few small jumps once a week – last week I got really brave and jumped 70cm with him! (In the picture below we were just doing tiny jumps as he was quite spooky that day).

Jumping Bob

I was told that Bob could spook quite badly; initially I didn’t see this side of him (just the occasional ‘look’ at things) but I do now know what was meant. He doesn’t spook particularly often (unless it is very windy), but a couple of times he’s nearly had me off. 

An example of this was two weeks ago on our hack; we were walking along with loose reins after having a canter when a bird flew up out of the hedgerow next to us. Bob span and tried to take off across the field – luckily I reacted quickly enough stop him, but I lost my stirrups and left the saddle for a few brief moments!

Overall, I’m having a great time with this little horse and he’s really helping me to improve my riding – I hope that I can continue to progress with him into the autumn.

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Dog agility – more jumping exercises

Recently I have felt that I’ve been lacking in inspiration for Rusty’s agility training, so it sort of ground to a bit of a halt for a while. We were working on improving her technique with the weave poles and tunnel, however she is an intelligent dog and as a result quickly becomes bored with simple repetitions of an obstacle. I can add in other things and create sequences but due to her inexperience with the weaves in particular I have to ensure that her approach to the weave poles is straight and easy for her to see – unfortunately this does limit what we can do, especially with our few pieces of equipment.

DOG

Over the past couple of days I set up the weaves and some jumps with the intention of just having a play to keep her feeling enthusiastic about her training.

It’s actually quite amazing how versatile a set of three jumps can be: there is a huge number of different arrangements of varying difficulties that can be set out, and even when I think I have exhausted all of the standard sequences, there really is no harm in just making something up and then figuring out how to handle it.

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The diagram below shows one of the exercises we practised. The red route drawn on is the easier of the two options I have shown – although this did still require skills which take time to learn. These include 180 degree turns and rear crosses (both of which I have written about previously).

Agility layout for blog

The first jump is very simple: I can just direct Rusty to it – however then I have to curve my body away a bit and head along the line of jumps to encourage her to turn and come back across the second jump. For the third jump, things become even more complicated as I have to ask Rusty for another 180 degree turn, but I am on the wrong side of the jumps and on the wrong side of Rusty to be able to ask properly. Needless to say, we’ve been struggling a bit with this!

So far, the best I have managed to do is to perform a rear cross (where I cross Rusty’s path behind her as she runs) and then ask her to swing back to the third jump. As you will be able to see from the video at the end of this post, this isn’t particularly smooth but I feel that with practice it may become easier.

The blue route is even trickier… I ask Rusty to jump the first hurdle, then wrap round the jump and jump the second in the same direction. This is then repeated for the third jump. Again, I can’t seem to handle this in a way that makes it a smooth sequence. I have a feeling that this may be because Rusty is constantly looking at me for instruction at the moment, and I really need her to look at where she is going more.

In fact, the other day she was so fixated on me that she walked into a chair! I use a combination of treats and toys as rewards for agility, and I am wondering whether me carrying the tennis ball more frequently is the reason for her increased attention. Although I have been doing this for a while with no problems, I may experiment with using a different reward to see if that helps her – I really do need her to watch her step on the course as it could potentially be dangerous if she doesn’t.

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The video below shows our training recently – there are some other clips in there of the weaves and some other simple jumping exercises as well.

Thank you for reading today’s post on Wild Call, stay tuned for more!

 

Agility training after a long break

Due to my A-level exams, I had to give up agility for a couple of months as there wasn’t enough time to fit it in. During that time I popped Rusty over a couple of jumps but we didn’t do much else, so today I began to re-familiarise her with the training we had done before.

Basics

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To get her listening to me and paying attention (her little head seemed to be into everything except my voice!) we went back to basics and practised sit, lie down, stay and come. Then we did a bit of heeling through changes of speed – her usual reaction to me speeding up is to blast ahead of me so I was pleasantly surprised when she managed to contain her energy.

Rusty 4

The next stage in our session was to set up a small jump and warm her up over it a few times.

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I then asked her for a slightly more challenging manoeuvre where I wanted her to wrap the jump and then re-jump it (almost creating a figure of eight shape).

Wrap

I also practised handling her from a greater distance and she still flew over the jump as if we had never had a break!

The final thing with the single jump was to remind her that she must have confidence to move ahead of me, so I stood back from the jump and sent her over it from behind.

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After this I added another jump and we worked through some 90º, 180º and 270º turns – to be entirely honest this was more beneficial to my handling skills than to her, as she seemed to remember everything I had previously taught her!

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Lastly, we worked through some easy weave poles – this is still our weakest area so it gives us something to focus on through the summer.

Weaves

 

The video below shows some short clips from our training session.