Introducing Leon

A few weeks ago, I ended my loan agreement with Bob. There were various reasons for this, one of which was that I didn’t feel as if he was enough of a challenge for me if I wanted to keep progressing. Over the summer he helped me to build my confidence up with hacking out and jumping and also allowed me to have a chance to get used to something that wasn’t as tall and leggy as the horses I have been riding for the past couple of years. 

Shortly before I stopped helping out with him, a lady at the same yard offered that I could start schooling her youngster, so this seemed like an ideal time to make the transition onto something more difficult.

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My new ride goes by the name of Leon – he is six years old and is mostly cob, although his owner has reason to believe that there may be a trace of Arab in him as well. I actually helped with Leon two years ago when he was just four years old, but at that time I lacked a lot of skill in my riding and it was a bit of a struggle at times.

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Taking my coat off while on Leon – he’s pretty bombproof for his age!

Having spent the last six months working on my position and effectiveness in the saddle, I considered myself pretty well prepared for getting back on. As it turned out, this wasn’t quite as easy as I had expected.

In the past two years, Leon has been broken to drive and is now driven out regularly by his owner. He also had some professional schooling for a short time. Despite this, he is still very green and doesn’t seem to understand what is expected of him in the school.

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One problem that became apparent to me when I started riding him was that he was incredibly dead to the leg – no amount of kicking, flapping or flicking him with a whip had any effect. Getting him to move forward was incredibly difficult; I tried talking to him as this is what he is used to when out driving and when this didn’t do anything I moved onto growling. He still showed the same lack of enthusiasm when in the school (I haven’t hacked him much yet but have been on another horse out with him – he can be very forward going when he wants to be!)

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Last week I had my first lesson on Leon with the same instructor who has taught me on Dusty. She watched me ride around for a few minutes, before stopping me and readjusting pretty much every part of my body – I’d slipped into some pretty bad habits.

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The pictures below show me a couple of weeks before the lesson, and then me after the lesson. There’s still a lot to work on, but I feel like I’ve made a step in the right direction. 

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Of course, every part of my body is linked and a mistake in one area can create more problems elsewhere. The fact that I was resting a lot of weight in my stirrups was causing my seat to shift further back, so that I was actually slightly behind the movement of the horse – this is a security thing that I picked up a few years ago – in reality I should be more ‘up’ on my seat bones and the majority of my weight should rest on my thighs/knees. I had broken this habit with Dusty and have really developed my lower leg position on him as well, however I do tend to revert back to my old habits when I start riding new horses.

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Lowering my hands is another habit of mine which has proven incredibly hard to break: it actually communicates to the horse that he needs to slow down, especially with Leon as he has a curb chain on his bridle (this is because of how forward he can be out hacking; he doesn’t really need it for schooling). Having the constant reminder to lift my hands up during my lesson showed me how much more forward Leon can be if he is ridden in a way that allows it. 

The issue with my elbows is not something that I have noticed before. I believe that it has surfaced with Leon because he is so green, and when asking him to turn I tend to overdo it and really pull the rein wide with a low hand. I’m now working to break this habit by keeping my elbows pinned into my sides and thinking of the turn as ‘opening a door’ to allow him to step through. This kind of visualisation is used a lot in the ‘ride with your mind’ techniques that I am being taught, and although it may sound slightly crazy it actually proves to be very helpful when I’m in the saddle.

I will of course continue to gather photos and videos of what I am up to over the coming weeks – for more regular updates you can find me on Instagram (@wildcallblog) or on YouTube (follow the link in the menu at the top of the page). 

I write about several subjects such as horses, dog agility and wildlife, so if there is anything that you would like to see more of then please do let me know in the comments. 

Thank you for reading! 

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