Dusty – kissing spines

Back in June, I travelled to Newmarket with Dusty’s owner to collect the ‘beast’ (as he is commonly nicknamed). He had been staying at the vets whilst they checked his legs and back.

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The reason for this was because his owner decided he should be looked at due to there being several issues in his ridden work, such as the fact that he struggles to bend on the left rein and often can’t pick up his left lead canter. It is also incredibly difficult to get him to work over his back properly – he will hold his head on the vertical giving the false impression that he is working properly, whereas in reality he is still very much on the forehand.

At the vets it was discovered that he has kissing spines, although it is relatively mild compared with some cases. Kissing spines is where the vertebrae are too close and actually touch each other, causing pain for the horse.

We think that this comes as a result of Dusty hollowing his back when he is ridden – and his owner believes that a previous owner/loaner of him may have used some kind of gadget on him in an attempt to force the head carriage that they wanted (despite the fact that it is supposed to come from the hind end!) I remember when Dusty first came to stay with us that she remarked on how muscled the underside of his neck was, and explained that it could mean that someone had used draw reins on him…

The treatment options for Dusty are as follows: he can have steroid injections into his back every year, or he could have an operation where sections of the vertebrae are actually removed.

He was given one set of injections before he left Newmarket, and the plan is to see how he gets on over the next few months. The operation would be expensive and would be a traumatic experience for him, so it would be better if it could be avoided.

This is where training comes into play. If we can teach Dusty that stretching his back properly will no longer hurt him (now that he has had steroid injections) and actually encourage him to work over his back, it will help to prevent the kissing spines from becoming worse and could eliminate the need for the operation.

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However this is easier said than done, and we have been battling with the prospect for some time now!

We are not fussing with his head too much at this stage, and are focusing more on getting him to track up and use his hind legs more. We are using trotting poles a lot and have been practising slowing his trot down to the point where he is almost walking before asking him to pick up the pace again (this encourages him to shift more weight onto his hind end).

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Over recent months we have also been learning more about our positions in the saddle – we had a couple of lessons with a ‘ride with your mind’ instructor. At first I wasn’t really sure about the whole idea but it was actually incredibly helpful and has benefited my riding a huge amount.

It will not be a quick process with Dusty but his owner has already had success out hacking; he has a lot more energy to give when he is out of the school!DSC_0001

Although I will be leaving home soon, I will see Dusty when I come home to visit so will continue to follow his journey.

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2 thoughts on “Dusty – kissing spines

  1. Wow, I didn’t know this could happen! I remember seeing people use these devices to keep their horse’s head bent. I always thought it looked kind of unnatural, but I didn’t know it could actually cause damage. Hope he can be fixed!

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